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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10373/1219

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Title: How was it for you? A cross-disciplinary study of ‘troublesome knowledge’ as identified by undergraduate students and lecturers in Geography, Medical Science and Psychology
Authors: MacAndrew, Siobhan B. G.
Spedding, Nicholas
Jamieson, Susan
Affiliation: University of Abertay Dundee. School of Social & Health Sciences
Keywords: Graduates for 21st Century
Threshold concepts
Enhancement themes
Issue Date: Sep-2011
Publisher: The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education
Type: Report
Refereed: peer-reviewed
Rights: This is the author's final version of this article. Published version (c)The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education
Citation: MacAndrews, S., Spedding, N. and Jamieson, S. 2011. How was it for you? A cross-disciplinary study of ‘troublesome knowledge’ as identified by undergraduate students and lecturers in Geography, Medical Science and Psychology. TiPZone
Abstract: Summary We carried out a small scale pilot study to determine whether participants would spontaneously identify Threshold Concepts (TC’s) and/or troublesome knowledge during open questioning on the characteristics of their disciplines. Students and lecturers reflected upon both easy and difficult aspects of their studies or teaching practice in either group discussions or one-to-one interviews. We compared students and staff observations both within and between the disciplines we examined (Geography, Medical Sciences and Psychology undergraduate degrees). Our intention was to provide specific examples of TC’s within our three disciplines to inform further discussion of embedding the enhancement theme both in our practice and in the learning experiences of our students. Our working hypothesis was that if TC’s exerted an influence on the teaching and learning experience either negatively or otherwise, then we would find ample evidence supplied in our interviews. What we found was that overwhelmingly our interviewees focussed on generic skills-based aspects of teaching and learning. Only three potential content-specific TC’s were offered spontaneously by students and these were all from the discipline of geography.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10373/1219
Appears in Collections:Social & Health Sciences Collection

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