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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10373/480

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Title: Monocular rivalry exhibits three hallmarks of binocular rivalry: evidence for common processes
Authors: O’Shea, Robert P.
Parker, Amanda
La Rooy, David J.
Alais, David
Affiliation: University of Abertay Dundee. School of Social and Health Sciences
Keywords: Monocular rivalry
Binocular rivalry
Colour
Perceptual ambiguity
Vision
Visual suppression
Depth of suppression
Issue Date: 29-Apr-2009
Publisher: Elsevier
Type: Journal Article
Refereed: peer-reviewed
Rights: This is the author's final version of this article. Published version (c)Elsevier, available at DOI: 10.1016/j.visres.2009.01.020
Citation: O’Shea, R.P., et al. 2009. Monocular rivalry exhibits three hallmarks of binocular rivalry: evidence for common processes. Vision Research. 49(7): pp.671-681. Available from DOI: 10.1016/j.visres.2009.01.020
Abstract: Binocular rivalry occurs when different images are presented one to each eye: the images are visible only alternately. Monocular rivalry occurs when different images are presented both to the same eye: the clarity of the images fluctuates alternately. Could both sorts of rivalry reflect the operation of a general visual mechanism for dealing with perceptual ambiguity? We report four experiments showing similarities between the two phenomena. First, we show that monocular rivalry can occur with complex images, as with binocular rivalry, and that the two phenomena are affected similarly by the size (Experiment 1) and colour (Experiment 2) of the images. Second, we show that the distribution of dominance periods during monocular rivalry has a gamma shape and is stochastic (Experiment 3). Third, we show that during periods of monocular-rivalry suppression, the threshold to detect a probe (a contrast pulse to the suppressed stimulus) is raised compared with during periods of dominance (Experiment 4). The threshold elevation is much weaker than during binocular rivalry, consistent with monocular rivalry’s weak appearance. We discuss other similarities between monocular and binocular rivalry, and also some differences, concluding that part of the processing underlying both phenomena is a general visual mechanism for dealing with perceptual ambiguity.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10373/480
ISSN: 0042-6989
Appears in Collections:Social & Health Sciences Collection

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