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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10373/501

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Title: “Binge drinking? It’s good, it’s harmless fun”: a discourse analysis of accounts of female undergraduate drinking in Scotland
Authors: Guise, Jennifer
Gill, Jan S.
Affiliation: University of Abertay Dundee. School of Social and Health Sciences
Keywords: Alcohol abuse prevention
Health promotion
Qualitative research
Women's health
Alcohol
Binge drinking
Student
Discourse analysis
Issue Date: 2007
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Type: Journal Article
Refereed: peer-reviewed
Rights: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Health Education Research following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version "Guise, J.M.F. and Gill, J.S. 2007. “Binge drinking? It’s good, it’s harmless fun”: a discourse analysis of accounts of female undergraduate drinking in Scotland. Health Education Research. 22(6): pp.895-906. Available froom DOI: 10.1093/her/cym034" is available online at: http://her.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/22/6/895
Citation: Guise, J.M.F. and Gill, J.S. 2007. “Binge drinking? It’s good, it’s harmless fun”: a discourse analysis of accounts of female undergraduate drinking in Scotland. Health Education Research. 22(6): pp.895-906. Available froom DOI: 10.1093/her/cym034
Abstract: Binge drinking in young people, particularly females and students, is a source of some concern to those engaged in health education. The concept is usually defined in terms of quantities of alcohol consumed within a relatively short space of time. Research suggests that reasons for drinking are varied, and are likely to be influenced by culture and context. This study aimed to explore issues important to female undergraduate students in Scotland. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 19 participants who were asked to describe what they understand by the term ‘binge drinking’, why they drink and what might trigger excessive consumption. Discourse analysis was used to explore the possible ‘functions’ of what was said, as well as the content. Participants showed sensitivity to how others might interpret their responses. They described binge drinking in terms of its behavioural effects rather than quantities consumed. Crucially, they positioned themselves outside the categories of ‘serious’ or ‘anti-social’ drinkers. These findings have important implications for our understanding of factors influencing drinking behaviour in this group of people, which in turn impacts on the potential design of health-enhancing interventions. The study also demonstrates the usefulness of a discourse analytic approach to accounts of drinking behaviour.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10373/501
ISSN: 0268-1153
Appears in Collections:Social & Health Sciences Collection

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