Logo
 

Abertay Research Collections >
Social & Health Sciences >
Social & Health Sciences Collection >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10373/528

View Statistics
Title: The social geometry of mobile telephony
Authors: Law, Alex
Affiliation: University of Abertay Dundee. School of Social and Health Sciences
Keywords: Mobile telephony
Social geometry
Simmel
Nomadic intimacy
Issue Date: 2005
Publisher: Razón y Palabra
Type: Journal Article
Refereed: peer-reviewed
Rights: Published version (c)Razón y Palabra, available at: http://www.razonypalabra.org.mx/anteriores/n42/alaw.html
Citation: Law, A. 2005. The social geometry of mobile telephony. Primera Revista Electronica en America Latina Especializada en Comunicacion. 42(Dec 2004/Jan 2005). Available at: http://www.razonypalabra.org.mx/anteriores/n42/alaw.html
Abstract: Mobile telephone technologies seem to be everywhere having profound effects on the nature of communication. They are being celebrated for the creativity of new mobile languages that have and are being generated and for emancipating communication from fixed points in space. But behind this lies a central paradox – mobile phones are ubiquitous and bodily intimate technologies but, at the same time, the public seems particularly fearful of any spatial proximity to mobile phone masts. Such fears are generally understood in terms of 'risk perception', an irrational consequence of media hype, faulty cognitive processing, or communication failure. This merely psychologises what is a deeply spatial paradox. The routine 'nomadic intimacy' of mobile phone usage establishes place as a mere backdrop to being always 'on-call', too absorbed in the 'busy-ness' of everyday life to notice what is close at hand. In contrast, 'place intimacy' becomes evident when public protest over the unwanted intrusion of phone masts helps refashion familiar places as meaningful, safe and worth protecting. Reaction to the unwanted intrusion of phone masts helps to refashion familiar places as meaningful, safe and worth protecting. In contrast, the routine nomadic intimacy of mobile phones establishes place as an indifferent backdrop to being always 'on-call', too absorbed in the 'busy-ness' of life to notice what is close at hand. In this respect, and contrary to the celebration of mobile telephony as a liberatory technology it may also be deepening the disenchantment with modern life.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10373/528
ISSN: 1605-4806
Appears in Collections:Social & Health Sciences Collection

Files in This Item:

There are no files associated with this item.

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Valid XHTML 1.0! DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2010  Duraspace - Feedback